Posts Tagged ‘kimono’

Chopa Zen Home and Gift Receives 2014 Best of Panama City Beach Award

Thursday, June 12th, 2014

Press Release

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Chopa Zen Home and Gift Receives 2014 Best of Panama City Beach Award

Panama City Beach Award Program Honors the Achievement

PANAMA CITY BEACH April 24, 2014 — Chopa Zen Home and Gift has been selected for the 2014 Best of Panama City Beach Award in the Online Retailer category by the Panama City Beach Award Program.

Each year, the Panama City Beach Award Program identifies companies that we believe have achieved exceptional marketing success in their local community and business category. These are local companies that enhance the positive image of small business through service to their customers and our community. These exceptional companies help make the Panama City Beach area a great place to live, work and play.

Various sources of information were gathered and analyzed to choose the winners in each category. The 2014 Panama City Beach Award Program focuses on quality, not quantity. Winners are determined based on the information gathered both internally by the Panama City Beach Award Program and data provided by third parties.

About Panama City Beach Award Program

The Panama City Beach Award Program is an annual awards program honoring the achievements and accomplishments of local businesses throughout the Panama City Beach area. Recognition is given to those companies that have shown the ability to use their best practices and implemented programs to generate competitive advantages and long-term value.

The Panama City Beach Award Program was established to recognize the best of local businesses in our community. Our organization works exclusively with local business owners, trade groups, professional associations and other business advertising and marketing groups. Our mission is to recognize the small business community’s contributions to the U.S. economy.

SOURCE: Panama City Beach Award Program

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Best online Retailer Award

Best online Retailer Award

Cover your Man in Yang Male Energy with this Navy Dragon Yukata

Wednesday, May 26th, 2010
Navy Dragon Yukata

Navy Dragon Yukata

Ladies, do you want your man to look fashionable by the pool or spa this summer?  Then maybe it’s time to start doing some early Father’s Day shopping.  This striking Navy Dragon Yukata is certain to get attention and make your favorite guy feel like a million bucks.  Perfect for lounging by the pool, as a summer bathrobe, or wherever he likes to relax, this 100% cotton yukata makes an impressive statement.

Made in Japan, the legendary dragon is emblazoned on this navy blue yukata, along with gray and white stylized clouds and calligraphy.  The dragon is depicted across Asian cultures as one of the Four Legendary Creatures, each of which is the guardian of the cosmic “directions”.  The Dragon guards the East, and was often painted alongside the other “creatures” (tortoise, tiger and red bird) to keep evil spirits away from early Chinese tombs.  The dragon is also represents the spring season, the colors green and blue, and the element of wood.  Its virtue is Propriety and it is an enduring symbol of Yang male energy.  (more…)

“Wax Poetic” in this Navy Haiku Kimono

Wednesday, April 28th, 2010
Navy Haiku Kimono

Navy Haiku Kimono

According to the Urban Dictionary, to “wax poetic” means to become increasingly verbose and romantic in speech, or to become more and more like a poem.  While these might not seem like the qualities conferred upon one by simply wearing a kimono; not all kimonos are decorated with this inspired Haiku design.  If you’re looking for some poetic inspiration, why not try this Navy Haiku Kimono?

The Japanese art of Haiku is the most important form of traditional poetry in Japan, and like most Asian traditions it has a long and storied history.  Haiku was originally perfected by the efforts of Masaoka Shiki in the 1890’s as a form of poetry that was to be written in such a way that it could stand alone as an independent poem, rather than being part of a longer chain of verses.  The writer of haikus can describe almost anything he or she likes, but haikus are to be written with the goal of giving the reader a whole new experience of an everyday situation.  Haiku poems are written in a pattern of 5, 7 and 5 syllables, and each haiku traditionally includes a seasonal word, or “kigo”.  While many “rules” exist about writing Japanese haikus, there is no consensus about how to write them in languages other than Japanese.

When one looks at this alluring navy blue kimono, the vertical nature of Haiku writing is evident and arouses curiosity.  Even if you cannot read Japanese, the striking white calligraphy of the Haiku pattern against a navy blue background may inspire you to “wax poetic” and get into a creative mood.  This lightweight Navy Haiku Kimono is made with 100% cotton and has a matching belt, which makes it more of a Yukata robe for spring and summer.  It makes a unique fashion statement when worn at the beach or by the pool, but it can also be worn when just relaxing at home.  View the Navy Haiku Kimono in at www.chopa.com.

Kimonos – The “thing to wear”

Monday, June 1st, 2009

Just one of many colorful Japanese Kimonos available from Chopa.com

 

 

 

 

In Japan, the  kimono is such a commonly known garment that the word “kimono” is literally translated as “thing to wear”, or clothing.

This particular type of full-length robe is a roomy, wide, and T-shaped, with little design variation, other than being available in a selection of splashy satin fabrics and colors.  In Japanese ceremonies, kimonos are worn by both men and women, which is why the hem falls about 56” down to the ankle.  They are typically wrapped around the body, left side wrapped over right, and finished with a wide belt, or obi, tied in the back. 

In modern-day Japan, kimonos are worn more often by women, primarily on special occasions.  A few elderly ladies and even fewer older gentlemen still wear a kimono every day.  They are also seen wrapped around professional Sumo wrestlers, who must dress in traditional Japanese attire when making public appearances. 

A lighter, more summery version of the Kimono is called the Yukata.  This 100% cotton, kimono-style robe is more commonly worn as loungewear, after a bath, or as a cover-up at the pool. While most Yukatas are made in less decorative fabrics than kimonos, there are many brightly colored fabrics available for women. 

Popular kimono designs include repetitive patters of koi, dragons, butterflies, cranes, lilies or cherry blossoms.  Most kimonos come with a matching fabric sash, but they are often worn with a heko or kaku obi, or belt, on special occasions.  

Kimonos are an elegant and traditional piece of Japanese culture, and the act of wearing one is steeped in tradition.  In addition to the many methods for wrapping and tying a kimono, there are subtle aspects of kimonos that, to a trained eye, can tell a lot about the wearer.  But don’t let this keep you from wearing one.  Unless you are attending a formal gathering in Japan, chances are you will never need to worry about adhering to these traditions.